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How Do I Choose the Best Professional Cleaning Service

Keeping your home clean can be an exhausting task, especially if you have to squeeze it in between the chaos and work and keeping your family in line. And if your life feels like it’s nothing but cleaning and tedious chores, perhaps it’s…

How to Keep Your Pool Clean Without Using Chemicals

The weather is getting hotter and hotter, and if you haven’t done it already, you are probably getting ready to open your pool and start the swimming season. Having a pool in your backyard is wonderful, but it requires quite some effort before you…

8 Ways to Make Food Shopping as a Parent More Bearable

No one is denying children aren’t the gift that keep on giving. But, as a parent, there are just some tasks in day to day adult life that shouldn’t be accompanied by kids. Namely the weekly food shop. Opening yourself up to a world of whining, potential tantrums and…

Speech therapy can address a wide variety of communication difficulties – problems pronouncing specific sounds, weak vocabulary, speaking with incorrect grammar, using language in socially inappropriate ways. And the list goes on! My hope in this blog is to highlight some issues I see in my own speech room and to address the concerns most prominent to you, the reader.



Strong speech skills provide a foundation for reading - if a child cannot pronounce a sound, he is going to have more difficulty reading words which contain that sound. Similarly, when a child cannot speak with correct grammar or vocabulary, he’ll have more difficulty predicting words in stories, and prediction is an invaluable skill to becoming a proficient reader. Speech and reading are both aspects of communication and our ability to communicate helps us establish relationships with others, enabling us to share our stories. And speaking of stories . . .



One afternoon, I picked up a group of Kindergarten students for their speech session. On the way to my classroom, one of the students became very animated; he gestured expansively and a rush of unintelligible words came pouring out. His poor articulation made it difficult to pick up more than a couple words but he supplemented with expressive body language. When we got to my room, he demonstrated even more effectively what had happened to him while on vacation. He pointed his finger like a gun; he grabbed a chair and laid it on its side, then pounded his fist into his arm. What trauma he had been through since I last saw him! I pieced together his story through his words and pantomime then confirmed more details later, by talking to his teacher and parents. The family had been robbed at gunpoint and this precious child needed to tell his story.



Fortunately, most of my students don’t have such dramatic tales to tell, but they do need to tell their own – tales of a new kitten, a trip to the county fair, a pair of new shoes. They also need to develop skills to read the stories of others. My purpose for this blog is to open a discussion about communication, answer questions regarding speech and language therapy, and share experiences. I fervently hope that together we can help the children in our care tell their own stories.

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